Ralph Crane

60 Pins
 9y
Collection by
a woman in a knitted dress and hat laying on a wicker lounge chair
Vikki Dougan by Ralph Crane
an old black and white photo of a woman laying on the floor
Ralph Crane, Portrait of Natalie Wood, 1950's
palm trees on the side of a road at night with lights in the background and fog
divan japonais
LA by Ralph Crane
a man standing in the doorway of a subway car with his hand up to him
obscura
New York Subway, 1969 Ralph Crane
an old black and white photo of children with cats on the side of a building
Black & White
casting 4 black cats - audition 4 tales of terror photo by Ralph Crane 4 LIFE, 1961
an old black and white photo of people dressed in costumes with feathered headdresses
Posters, Art Prints, Framed Art, and Wall Art Collection
Showgirls sitting in the dressing room of the Stardust Hotel. Photograph by Ralph Crane. Las Vegas, Nevada, 1959.
an old black and white photo of people sitting on a bench in front of a stop sign
vikkidouganbus
Vikki Dougan by Ralph Crane
Ralph Crane, 1950s Couple, Fotos, Hot, Fotografie, Fotografia, Model, Photographer, Female Models, Fashion Photo
Ananasamiami.com
Ralph Crane, 1950s
a woman sitting on top of a bed next to a dresser and mirror in a room
Looking Back At Vikki “The Back” Dougan (A Biography)
vintage vikkie dougan in sheer black nightie Ralph Crane photo for Life
a woman sitting on top of a metal fence next to an empty swimming pool in black and white
Creeping Irrelevance
Vikki Dougan - Ralph Crane - Swiming pool
an old black and white photo of a man looking at the camera with his eyes wide open
Black & White
Peter O’Toole as Hamlet, 1963. Photo by Ralph Crane for LIFE.
black and white photograph of two people sitting at a table
Natalie Wood, 1950′s by Ralph Crane
a man in a tuxedo is speaking into a microphone at a table with chess pieces on it
Charlie Chaplin — who had been living in self-imposed exile in Switzerland for two decades — blows a kiss to the crowd while accepting an honorary Oscar in 1972 for "the incalculable effect he has had in making motion pictures the art form of this century." When he was introduced to the audience, Chaplin received a twelve-minute standing ovation by Ralph Crane